Editors & Publishers

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WALKER AND COMPANY
175 FIFTH AVENUE
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10010
TELEPHONE: 646-307-5580
FAX: 212-727-2837

February 2008

Dear Editors and Producers,

There is nothing quite like primary season to remind us of the power of speech—especially with the possibility that the upcoming election hinges not necessarily on a candidate’s record, policy, or promises but on his or her speeches from the stump. As old as politics itself, oration has defined and dramatized American politics and shaped our nation’s political destiny. Most remarkably, at a time in human history marked by technological advancement and innovation, the power of the spoken word has remained the same—just as speeches and speechwriting have remained a fundamental tool of presidential campaigning.

In Live from the Campaign Trail: The Greatest Presidential Campaign Speeches of the Twentieth Century and How They Shaped Modern America (Walker & Company / July 1, 2008 / 576 pages / $16.99 paperback ), professional speechwriter Michael A. Cohen brings to life the speeches that have driven our nation’s political discourse—speeches that have inspired, energized and motivated, speeches that have transformed modern America. This collection of twenty-seven of the most influential presidential campaign speeches of the 20th century provides an unprecedented means for viewing our country’s political history. From the legendary, William Jennings Bryan’s “Cross of Gold” speech and Ronald Reagan’s call for a “national crusade to make America great again” to the infamous, including Richard Nixon’s “Checkers” speech and Bill Clinton’s rhetorical broadside against the rapper Sister Souljah; to the poignant, such as FDR’s evocation of America’s “rendezvous with destiny,” Hubert Humphrey’s call for America to walk “into the bright sunshine of human rights,” and John F. Kennedy’s demand for an end to “religious intolerance,” Cohen uses the great oratory of the last century to help us examine how we arrived where we are today in American politics, and how to better understand the grand themes underscoring the political debates of the twenty-first century.

Michael A. Cohen is a professional speechwriter who has worked in both politics and corporate communications. A senior research fellow at the New America Foundation, Cohen has taught speechwriting and political rhetoric at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He lives in Brooklyn.

If you’d like more information on this book or would like to speak with Michael please don’t hesitate to be in touch. I look forward to hearing from you.

All best,

Carrie M. Majer
Bloomsbury Publicity
646.307.5067
carrie.majer@bloomsburyusa.com